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competition and openness in the markets. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can reall
historic when we accomplish it. that is to start the work on a u.s. e.u. trans-atlantic trade that investment or airship to grow prosperity on both sides of the atlantic. it is no secret that we both faced economic challenges. we all do in this new marketplace, and a global challenge the marketplace. the fact is that europe freestanding aloud is the largest economy in the world and when you join that together with the united states of america, we have a powerful ability to be able to affect the rules of the road and to be able to raise standards and most importantly create jobs for all of our people. europe is already america's largest trading partner. a disagreement will create more jobs for additional investment and nasty note earlier this month, president obama made it clear this is a top priority for the united states. we also discussed the responsibility that we share to support fragile democracies across the world, across the monograph from libya to tunisia and beyond. i say to our friends here in the united kingdom, it is in our mutual interest to see that these fledgli
that perhaps is even more fundamentally dangerous for britain and much of the rest of europe than taming the e.u.'s superstate tendencies. this is the problem of attitudes and how the institutional expression in the economy. because as i illustrate in "becoming europe" the prevailing conviction across most of europe is that the state is the primary way in which we address common problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. that such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics doesn't apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders including i have to say a considerable number of the center-right european politicians. so in this regard i have often wondered what -- would think if he read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it's about the new world, democracy in america was sent written for an american audience. alexis de tocqueville's intended audience was europe. so i think you would be astonished to learn how the americans observed by de tocqueville dealt with p
move in a couple of weeks to, i hope, the negotiations on the e.u. budget. .. in the last 12 months, we have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without
with asean, singapore, japan and korea. and we're also in dialogue with the eu. we have been talking about a bilateral investment treaty, but not necessarily with a due sense of urgency. for meeting since negotiations started in 2007 does not suggest a great deal of haste. much as it might surprise, we want this as much as you did because it is also of interest to us. ladies and gentlemen, important as they are, market access issues, and goods and services, and i to be seen perspective for they can be made to define narrative. why we must work to sort out these challenges, it is not in our interest to let such issues define the relationship. this is why we have proposed to create an ad hoc clearinghouse mechanism to discuss market access issues in the trade policy forum. i believe that we also need to find a new positive narrative that can bind our countries closer together. one such opportunity i feel is in the energy sector. without a shirt access to energy inputs in sufficient quantities, we will not be able to sustain our economic development. therefore, an enduring in the u.s. partner
dangerous for britain and much of the rest of the euro in the eu superstate tendencies. and this is a problem of values, attitudes, and how these are given in institutional expression in the economy. as i illustrate in becoming europe, the prevailing conviction across most of your is that the state is the primary way in which we address : problems and meet our responsibilities and obligations to our fellow citizens. such obligations might be realized outside the realm of politics and that does not apparently occurred to large numbers of european political leaders, including, i have to say, a considerable numbers of center-right european politicians so in this regard have often wondered what a confirmed man would think if you read a particularly important book that was written 180 years ago by one of his compatriots. because although it is about the new world, democracy in america was not written for an american audience. the intended audience was your. i suspect he would be astonished to learn how the americans built with problems that were beyond an individual's capaci
. this is something that is totally in line with the e.u. inspiration of social market economy, and we are lead by, first of all securing the sustainability of public finances in the long-term, including a pension reform, and also looking at the de facto for growth. infrastructures, long delayed in italy, we have simplified the process of building infrastructures and injected in acceleration on those. then the functioning of the markets and that we have introduced more competition for example, in the leader of professions, like to call themselves -- but many pressures to become liberal. and in the separation between gas production and gas distribution, to give you another example. all in the shopping hours and the commerce sector. also a lot of significant indication concerning -- of course this needs to be continued and one issue about the italian elections in which i will not go unless -- here today is which political configuration is more in line with the need to sustain these structures. but i believe that -- not even the largest countries can really keep a momento for growth or resume a momen
works. now when you work on a problem like this, as we do in the u.s., perhaps not at the scale the e.u. will, we'll find out. you learn not only more things about the brain but you learn how to build better computers and circles around and all boats rise. but the one mess age i want to leave with you with is that basic research still done in universities primarily including this new world of use inspired basic research with good interaction with companies and so forth producing the independenceble feed stock for companies and especially for young entrepreneurial companies that increasingly drive innovation, products, and jobs. mr. chairman, rajing member johnson, thank you for the opportunity to be here. i'll be happy to answer any questions. >> thank you. thank you for your testimonies today. i'll recognize myself for five minutes to ask questions and mr. templeton i would like to address my first question to you. let me preface by saying this in the united states every year $400 billion is spend on research and development. about $140 billion comes from the federal government. those
to employ unconventional tools to further eu's monetary policy, even though the efficacy of these tools was uncertain and it was recognized that their use might carry some potential cost. the better known of these tools is the purchase of large amounts of longer-term government security, what is commonly referred to as quantitative easing. the other in conventional tool is not as forward guidance, providing information about the future path of short-term interest rates anticipated by the committee. both of these approaches are intended to address a gap caused by the effective lower bound. this gap is the shortfall between what the fomc likely would do in current economic circumstances, were it able to reduce the federal funds rate below zero the reality that the rate can't be cut further. i believe the federal reserve's asset purchases and other unconventional policy actions have helped, and are continuing to help fill this gap and to sure up -- short of aggregate demand the evidence just the fomc's actions to lower short and longer term borrowed rates and boost asset prices. howeverpri
a letter asking the e.u. to declare hezbollah a terrorist . >> one minute remaining. >> the terrorist organization in 2007 while killing our soldiers in iraq. he refused to sign a letter to president george w. bush talking -- he said to engage direct, talks with the government of iran. he was for that telling bush to do it. he voted against the iranian sanctions. he was one of two senators who failed to sign a letter to president clinton showing unconditional support for the state of israel. i would argue his record when it comes to iran and vale and statements he made put him well out of the mainstream and "the washington post" is right on the fridge. and now is the time to have somebody on the fringe of iran and israel serving as secretary of defense for the reason. ly vote no. debate should continue and when we get back unless there's a bomb shell. thank you. >> thank you. i yield the floor. senator from michigan. >> yield five minutes for the senator of wfd. >> senator from west virginia. >>. >> madam president. proudly support chuck hagel for secretary of defense. if he can make
need to try to find one with regard to the application of the eu verify the agriculture. lastly i just want to note that we do support, unlike the president's bill, the abdication of e-verify to the entire work force. is building the exhibit something like 60% of all employers. and lastly, i just want to note that we have strongly supported e-verify as part of competence of immigration reform. will continue to do so. our four-plex and border security, more visas for the high skilled lesser skilled agriculture, arrival employment verification system, and the means to bring the undocumented out of the shadows and give them something legal status in this country. and not blocking a pathway to citizenship. thank you for your consideration, mr. chairman. >> accuser. ms. tulli. >> chairman gowdy, ranking member lofgren, and members of the subcommittee, chairman gowdy, ranking member lofgren, and members of the subcommittee, thank you for this opportunity to share the national immigration law center's perspective on e-verify. the national immigration law center has advocate for changes to e-v
countries don't have this issue, but think about the health care system would work for the e.u.. that is a closer model than the health care system that works for the health care system and thinking about one of our larger states adopting at so it is going to be recognizing that we have taken one step in terms of expanding coverage. we are still struggling with how to get a more efficient outcome oriented health care system and it is going to take a lot of changes over the next decade or two decades. we've been having some of these discussions in medicare since its inception. this isn't going to be so because one piece of legislation was passed. it was health care reform 1.0 triet hang on. the rest is going to becoming for the next decade or two. >> in our history we have had problems in the policy development and looking at health systems abroad because of ideology. it must be terrible. but i think that what is happening as we have identified a whole range of more technical issues. how to pay organizations, how-to and sent individual providers, how to engage the patience that
u.s. emissions are actually down, i think it is 8%. eu emissions are down like 9%. but chinese emissions are up 30%. look at, look at where the coal is being burned. i think in five years india is supposed to become the second largest burner of coal right behind china. so the global picture on emissions is, if the national one wasn't enough to make you cry, i mean, just sort of think globally as sort of where we're going, you know? so, that's the crying part. and you asked me bright spots so. i mean there actually are, there actually are some, relax, i mean, the news, car standards that were just promulgated will double fuel economy by 2020 five. california is moving ahead and i think is a real bright spot. rggi is strengthening their targets. that's a bright spot. the cap-and-trade in australia looks like, i mean, who knows, another government might fall over their program here but it's a bright spot. they have got a plan. they have got a program. south korea is thinking about instituting emissions trading. china has seven sort of experiments around the country looking at emis
overwhelmed either by europe writ large, the eu or china somehow swallowing up every bit of innovation that exist in the world. they are no longer i think worried about our economy being overwhelmed beyond our shores. but, and i don't think there is no, very little doubt in any circles out there about america's ability to be in position to lead the world in the 21st century. not only in terms of our foreign policy, our incredible defense establishment, but economically. i think the american people are ready to get up as a civil rights leader when i was coming up as a kid said, the american people are just tired of being tired. get up and move. you guys know that because it's happening in your state. you're probably feeling it in your fingertips more than most of us do here in washington. and as i said i think they know we're better positioned than any of the nation in the world to lead the world. and that's what i think they are so frustrated by what they see and don't see happening here in washington. and i think their frustration is turning into a little bit of anger. i found an inte
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14